Avengers: Infinity War – official trailer

So this is it guys… the final trailer for Marvels upcoming Infinity War and possibly the most important film in the MCU to date, as the Avengers, Guardians and other heroes all come together to fight Thanos for the fate of humanity and oh you know, the universe… as Gamora clearly puts it in the start of the trailer. We do get some interesting looking new footage from this trailer as well, laying out Thanos’ plan – in his words to bring balance… wiping out half of the universe and humanity along with it.

It’s great to see the Avengers + The Guardians finally interacting after much teasing and the chemistry looks pretty natural, Star Lord and Tony in particular make for a fun pairing. Thanos is after the rest of the infinity stones as we all know, one in Visions’ head and one with Dr Strange in the eye of Agammoto, which leads him to Earth to find them, it’s also interesting to note that Thanos still hasn’t met any of the Avengers or Guardians bar Nebula and Gamora (his daughters).

It seems that the Avengers come up with some sort of plan to protect some or both of the stones? In Wakanda, bringing Steve, Bucky, Hulk, Falcon and Black Widow there, where they’re set on by Thanos’ army, Thor seems to be somewhere not good as he’s tortured by Thanos as his black order and Loki (what, another betrayal? Or maybe he’s captured) watch on.

Meanwhile, Tony, Star Lord, Drax and Spiderman are all together as well somewhere…. this is curious as I guess the Avengers are not all together for one reason or another following Civil War and we still don’t see Vision or Scarlett Witch fighting, nor do we see Star Lord or Tony in Wakanda… unless they’re come up with some sort of plan to take on Thanos. Anyway we see fighting as is to be expected, as well as Captain America taking on Thanos 1 on 1, which is the bravest and possibly also the worst idea ever but he does seem to be putting up a fight which makes for a great shot. With the trailer ending on Spiderman and Dr Strange meeting and having a funny exchange, showing Marvels consistent humorous nature despite this being a decidedly dark and serious MCU film from the looks of it.

All in all it’s a great trailer, I don’t know if it’ll break records like the last Inifnity War trailer but the hype is already here, mark it down – April 27th people, this is going to be a thrill ride.

Just some additional thoughts

. Where are Vision and Scarlett Witch in all of this?

. Assuming Thanos gets the mind stone, is Vision dead?

. Is Loki playing each side for his own or is he just in Thanos pocket?

. Will the Avengers plan for taking on Thanos include his daughters?

The Last Jedi – a fantastic deconstruction of the hero archetype

Here’s a hot take for you 3 months after The Last Jedi and with no one talking about the film anymore (I know!), The Last Jedi is brilliant but not necessarily because it has one particularly cool fight scene…. or great visuals or a diverse cast. It’s brilliant because of its writing and in how it breaks down the role of the hero in the story (Luke Skywalker, though to a degree Rey is as well), subverting expectations and pulling the rug from under the audience in typical Rian Johnson style.

A true credit to the films direction and it’s great writing.

This will not…. go the way you think

Much has been said about The Last Jedis subversion of audience expectations for Luke and the plot in general, “Did you expect me to face on the empire with a laser sword?” Luke even says flat out to Rey at one point, highlighting the reality of the situation he’s in and slyly winking at some Star Wars fans who wanted him to do exactly that. The reality of the situation was very different though, Like, now an older, wiser but disillusioned Jedi master was wary of the force and critical of the Jedi, a hero to the republic and living legend and that no one had even seen for years, he was not the hero, you, me, Rey or any other film goer was expecting.

And that’s great! I’ve seen a trend in some notable films in recent years with the breakdown of the hero or father figure type in stories, with them not being as great in truth or as heroic as they’re imagined to be, the truth often hurts but is eye opening to characters who find it out one way or another, just like in Coco and even as recently as Black Panther with T’chala and another prominent character who I won’t name for sake of spoilers. I find this type of storytelling fascinating because it highlights the reality of the world itself that we live in, which is imperfect, even with fantastic, magical sci-fi settings that allow travelling faster than the speed of light and moving things with an invisible force, people are still imperfect and heroes can and do fail.

Don’t meet your heroes 

The Jedi, for all their strong efforts and good intentions, completely failed and like Luke said, allowed themselves to be infiltrated by Emperor Palpatine and subsequently wiped out by him which was a great point by Mr Skywalker, the Jedi, like him were also imperfect. So why should he go and help the rebellion wielding a lightsaber, fighting for a belief system he doesn’t even believe in any more? It seems completely illogical and flat out stupid from Lukes’ perspective so in my view, his actions are completely realistic and justified – but even then, he still does what he can to help The Resistance, solidfying his legendary status, the hallmarks of a true hero in my eyes. But for all intents and purposes, before Luke makes his ultimate sacrifice, he has failed, failed to continue the Jedi legacy, failed to reach out to Ben and failed to live up to his own potential, it’s a tragic arc for a beloved hero and is one of the hottest points of contention for the film and surely pissed off a lot of fans but again, it’s so impactful, maddening even because it feels so real.

Rian Jonson brought elements of the real world kicking and screaming into Star Wars and for better or for worse, shook things up, with more well, human like characterisation, far removed from the purely evil emperor who just wants to destroy everything – though Supreme Lord Snoke is arguably just that redux but moving on… Luke’s deconstruction is a good thing and very in line as he’s always been an imperfect protagonist, wanting to go into flight school and never even wanting to get involved in the galactic war, almost giving up his training at Dagobah with Yoda and maybe not so wisely attacking Vader on Bespin in a blind rage, he’s made mistakes but he always prevailed through his positivity, being a lovely, caring individual the whole way.

The point of this isn’t to combat the plethora of criticisms against The Last Jedi, far from it in fact. But to highlight the films’ interesting character arcs and deconstruction of some of the series most beloved characters, from Luke, to Kylo and to Rey, Lukes arc didn’t go the way people thought it would but that’s not a bad thing at all, surprises can be a good thing and are often a feature of life – things don’t always go the way we expect or want them to and that’s another way Rian Jonson brings aspects of ‘the real’ into Star wars.And hey criticising a films plot for not going the way you wanted it to devalues the entire concept of a story you have no control over I’d say but hey that’s just like… my opinion, don’t destroy me The Last Jedi haters!

But yes those are just some of my thoughts, in the end we all love Star Wars at the end of the day (still, I hope) and let’s hope Solo is as good as the last two films in the franchise.

Murder On The Orient Express – review

So I’ve finally got around to watching Murder On The Orient Express, the latest cinematic portrayal of the novel of the same name, written by legendary author Agatha Cristie, this film is directed by Kenneth Branagh and follows famed detective Hercule Poirot, who has a knack for solving seemingly unsolvable crimes – finding himself aboard a train which a murder takes place on. The film stars Kenneth Branagh, Johnny Depp, Daisey Ridley, Michelle Pfeiffer, Judi Dench, Josh Gad, Willem Dafoe, Penelope Cruz, Leslie Odom Jr.

I won’t lie, I’m not too familiar with Agatha Christies body of work or with MOTE in particular either but I was drawn to the film due to my own interest in turn of the 20th century/early 1900s in general, the talented Kenneth Branagh both directs and starts in this adaptation which is quite a feat, producing a final product that actually isn’t that bad I feel. Despite all the signs possibly signally otherwise, with such a large ensemble cast and Branagh directing himself, one could assume the film is a bit self indulgent because of the star power on show but it’s not quite that. That being said, the writing does lend itself to the theatrical in a sense, with over the top characters, dialogue and specific scenes that almost feel like you’re watching a play, especially with the lavish sets and fancy old-timey costumes (Oh I do love a period drama).

The cast is actually really sold on the whole, from the lesser known actors right up to Michelle Pfeiffer, Johnny Depp and Penelope Cruz, with Josh gad in particular bringing a memorable performance, the problem with films with such large casts like this is that you often don’t have enough time to really explore them all which may be a weak point for the story, especially when you have more interesting characters hanging around. And to be fair, MOTE isn’t exempt from this, with a handful of quite weird, intriguing characters that are on the fringes of the story, maybe understandably taking a back seat to the central murder mystery which is fair enough. The good writing of the novels story itself does drive the film forward though, with the murder keeping you mostly engaged as you watch, though the solution does get a tad convoluted into the final third of the film but it does wrap itself up quite nicely I feel.

And speaking of performances, you simply can’t avoid Branagh as the larger than life Poirot, eccentric but a brilliant mind, he is the star of the show and one of the best features of the film as a whole, bringing enthusiasm to every scene he’s in, coupled with serious determination as well, making for a dynamic, interesting character. People unfamiliar with Christies novels may find Poirot a bit cartoonish and strange without any back story to him but it’s a credit to the film to let people sort of fill in the blanks for now, without throwing a tonne of exposition to describe Poirot, we may not know much about him now in the context of the films world but we may find out.

Ultimately Murder On The Orient Express is a decent enough film, not exactly ground breaking but I don’t think it was intended to be, with a large cast that on the whole does a great job, great costume design and production and a memorable performance from Brannagh, I’d like to see more of him as Poirot going forward.


. Has some strong perfromances

. Engaging plot, keeps audience interest

. Final third may lose some viewers interest, plot gets a bit convoluted

Solo: A Star Wars Story could be setting itself up for failure

As you probably know, Solo: A Star Wars Story is out soon, I mean like 2 and a half months from now – May 25th to be precise and that’s cool, May was a release month for a Star Wars film (Revenge Of The Sith) and none since but it’s a good enough month, school’s ending for kids and summer film season officially kicks off in this month according to most people but there’s one big problem and I have no idea how Disney/Kathleen Kennedy/whoever makes the final decision with the films production is ok with it.

The release date, oh god the release date…. or release window more specifically, it’s terrible and not on the face of it but because Solo is sandwiched between some sure to be mega-hits which will all but ensure a reduced box office run and maybe even failure, the first genuine box office flop for a A Star Wars film that people are already so-so about? Quite possibly. You see, it’s out about a month after Avengers: Infinity War (April 27th) which is fair enough you say, Avengers will have cleaned house and grossed its $1 billion way before then in all likelihood so it won’t be the main competition and that’s likely… but you’d be forgetting another major May release – Deadpool 2.

The Merc with a mouths anticipated sequel is out on May 18th, just a week before Solo, the film going audience for the two films is for sure going to inter-sect quite a bit but with the runaway success Deadpool, it’s not a film anyone really wants to go up against, especially with the hype and avid fanbase it already has, who will probably go for repeat viewings. Oh and don’t forget a little film called Incredibles 2, sequel to one of the most beloved Pixar and animated films of all time, out on June 15th, just about 3 weeks after Solos debut, again pretty bad news for a film that will pretty much 100% have a sizeable weekend opening… oh and Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom‘s out the week after that on June 22nd just for good effect. So all in all, I’ve got a bad feeling about this.

So what does this spell for Solo? Well a bit of uncertainty really, we’re not sure how the film will do critically, how people will receive Alden Ehenreich as Solo though I think he will definitely be divisive, we’re not sure how this will shape ‘Star Wars story’ films in fans eyes going forward, there’s just a lot of uncertainty here but this release window specifically might just have killed Solo before it’s even out, the film has also been embroiled in a recent poster plagiarism controversy just to add to the troubles surrounding the project. Anyway I don’t want to be a bad news bear and write off the film before even seeing it and to be honest always want a Star Wars film to do well – but it’s got an uphill battle for sure, it may be very hampered in potential returns because of the films releasing around it but this will be an interesting test for Disney and Star Wars. Disney will be effectively competing with itself with Infinity War and Solo but we’ll see how a non-mainline Star Wars film does against potential big competition, Rogue One did very well for itself during its run but two things – that was in December, now a big month for potential commercial success for tent pole films and again, it was pretty closely tied to the mainline Star Wars story, which Solo is even further removed from.

I can’t pretend to know the answer for a perfect release date for Solo and I’m not a film industry professional but May and June are both pretty packed with big franchise films coming out, so maybe a later release could have done the trick? But hey if the film sticks with its date, we may never know.

Will Star Wars fans still flock to the film despite it being an origin story, having no Jedi (most likely) and despite a few fans not really wanting it at all? It remains to be seen but I have to say, the film has my curiosity piqued and I’m really interested in seeing how it ends up doing, for Disney and for Star Wars as a whole.

The 2018 Oscars- thoughts, reactions

So a little old award show happened last night as you may know and a bunch of good looking, rich people who pretend to be other people for a living gave each other awards – it was the Oscars!  The 90th edition, hosted by none other than Jimmy Kimmel and full disclosure I didn’t watch the show as I can’t really be bothered to with award shows these day but importantly, I know the results.

And this isn’t about me so I don’t really care about what predictions I got wrong or right – though I see I called a fair few results right on what was ultimately a pretty predictable night, albeit a good overall show form what I’ve heard that passed off mostly without controversy or people being stupid so that’s good

An ecstatic Guillermo Del Toro

The Shape Of the Oscars 

So Del Toro and The Shape Of Water did quite well with 4 award wins – best score, best director, best picture and best production design, all reasonable wins (maybe apart from best picture?) but no film really swept the show and dominated with 5,6 or more wins in what was a pretty moderate night for the big front runners Shape Of Water, 3 Billboards, Darkest Hour, all getting decent award wins in big categories. I’m happy for Del Toro with his best director win though and the momentum was clearly with him and TSOW, in any other year it would have been Nolan or Paul Thomas Anderson in my view but a nicer director on the night couldn’t have won but we have to get to a somewhat controversial choice in TSOW for best picture. I’ve seen a few dissenting voices on this and I somewhat agree, the film was good, memorable and definitely a love letter to classic hollywood films of old and fantasy but the best film of 2017? Not quite, not for me anyway.

I thought 3 Billboards or The Darkest Hour had that nailed on but it is what it is, no sour grapes and I’m happy TSOW got some recognition. Phantom Thread won best costume design which is fair enough, though I expected it to go to Beauty and The Beast but the only real major snubs of the night were for Baby Driver I feel, completely left out for sound editing and sound mixing which went to Dunkirk. And don’t get me wrong Dunkirk is a great film but I thought BD deserved something in the technical categories.

Well deserved mr Deakins.

A night of ‘Finallys’!

In pretty tame, predictable Oscar night fashion, the people and films most people thought would win did but with some nice ‘finally!’ moments to boot, Jordan Peele, the first African American man to win an Oscar for best original screenplay is one fantastic moment, in a win that clearly meant a lot to him. As did the win for iconic cinematographer Roger Deakins finally winning an Oscar for best cinematography for Bladerunner 2049, wasn’t the dude nominated like 14 times previously without winning…. yeah how did that happen again? Plus Gary Oldman finally won an Oscar for best actor in The Darkest Hour, being criminally under-nominated in his career in my view, a well worthy win. Sam Rockwell picking up the best supporting actor win after years of grinding it out in indies is also pretty great, he’s a fantastic actor and this was well deserved, while wins for Frances McDormand for best actress and Allison Janney for best supporting actress are deserved and not surprising.

The Oscars in recent years have had a few of these ‘finally’ moments actually, from Leo DiCaprio finally winning that Oscar for best actor a few years back to Deakins and Oldman this year, let’s hope we see some more obvious wins for obvious great talent in the next couple Oscars, Amy Adams…. Henry Cavill anyone? Also let’s get a few more sci-fi films up in the mix, more sci-fi films for best picture, more sci-fi films for best adapted/original screenplay, the genre always gets noms for visual effects, production design and editing but as an avid fan, I’d love to see more noms.

And that’s about really, an overall good, solid night of awards that went on without a hitch, with some deserved wins and yeah, more of that Oscars, big improvement on the borefest of 2017 and recent years. Recognizing diverse talent is the key here and I think Hollywood and the academy is getting there, nominating and acknowledging ethnic minorities for good work and women for good work, not just for the sake of it but because they actually put in good work, Hollywood and other film industries (even here in the UK) still have a ways to go to improve balance and representation of people working in the industry but we will get there. Anyway here’s hoping 2018 gives us some fantastic films to look back on in a years time for the 2019 Oscars!

Oscar 2018 predictions

Yes I know I’m a bit late to the Oscar train but Oscar season is about to come to its dramatic close and Oscar’s old, 90 years old this year in fact but evolving maybe…. with a batch of nominees that feel a bit more diverse and representative of film going audiences (in my view) and while things aren’t perfect maybe we’re getting there.

Anyway with the Oscars coming up tomorrow, I haven’t really done any coverage on the awards thus far but I wanted to give my opinion regardless because there are a few shoe-ins in terms of predicted winners but I’m hoping for some surprises. I’ve also only made predictions for films that I’ve seen and have knowledge to predict on, because I do this every year and predicting winners for films I haven’t seem does seem a bit disingenuous in my view and I always want to give my authentic, real thoughts and views on things, so here goes:


Best Picture:

Call Me By YouR Name
The Darkest
Hour – winner
Get Out
Lady Bird
Phantom Thread
The Post
The Shape of Water
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Very hard category this year with 3 or 4 strong contenders for the win – 3 Billboards has the biggest buzz around it for sure but Phantom Thread is the quintessential best picture film in my opinion, plus it has Daniel Day Lewis but hold on, I’m going with The Darkest Hour, a loved film all around with Gary Oldmans performance stealing headlines and it’s the film I want to win. But thinking logically, it’s flatly between The Shape of Water, Phantom Thread and Three Billboards.


Best Actress:

Sally Hawkins, The Shape of Water
Frances McDormandThree Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri – winner
Meryl Streep, The Post
Margot Robbie, I, Tonya
Saoirse Ronan, Lady Bird

Another year of strong nominees for best actress, the evergreen Meryl Streep would be a shoe- in any other year but some memorable performances from Hawkins and McDormand may just steal the night, I think Frances McDormand wins this one though, the momentum is with Three Billboards and people seem to love her specifically in the film, so yeah.


Best Actor:
Timothée Chalamet, Call Me By Your Name
Daniel Day-Lewis, Phantom Thread
Daniel Kaluuya, Get Out
Gary Oldman, Darkest Hour winner
Denzel Washington, Roman J. Israel, Esq.

Very strong list of nominees here, with a notable nomination for Daniel Kaluuya which is pretty incredible, it would be fitting and a perfect send off for Daniel Day-Lewis to get the Oscar but he has enough, right? I think Gary Oldman wins this one, with his dedication to the role and brilliant method acting, he’s also never won an Oscar somehow despite some great performances so it’s about time.


Best Supporting Actress:
Mary J. Blige, Mudbound
Allison Janney, I, Tonya
Lesley Manville, Phantom Thread
Laurie MetcalfLady Bird – winner
Octavia Spencer, The Shape of Water

Maybe one of the more contentious categories with a surprise in store, I don’t see a nailed on winner here but I do think that Laurie Metcalf may just win it, I don’t think Lady Bird will win much on the night apart from this, people may be expecting Allison Janney to knick it for I, Tonya but this may be a surprise win.


Best Supporting Actor:

Willem Dafoe, The Florida Project
Woody Harrelson, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
Richard Jenkins, The Shape of Water
Christopher Plummer, All the Money in the World
Sam Rockwell, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri – winner

Interesting category this year with 3 Billboards having two nominees but even without this, I think Sam Rockwell wins on the night, he’s a fantastic actor and is great in the film and it’s surprising he hasn’t won more awards in the past.


Best Director:

Paul Thomas Anderson, Phantom Thread
Guillermo del ToroThe Shape of Water – winner
Greta Gerwig, Lady Bird
Christopher Nolan, Dunkirk
Jordan Peele, Get Out

Strong category here with some directors who would win in any other year but I may go with the general consensus and say Del Toro wins it, because he’s a great director dedicated to his craft and I think the academy and people generally love The Shape of Water, Paul Thomas Anderson is an academy darling though, despite Phantom Thread not really having that much buzz around it, it could somehow sneak the win.


Best Original Screenplay:

The Shape of Water (Guillermo del Toro and Vanessa Taylor; story by Guillermo del Toro)
Lady Bird (Greta Gerwig)
The Bick Sick (Emily V. Gordon and Kumail Nanjiani)
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (Martin McDonagh)  – winner
Get Out (Jordan Peele)

I think I’d like Get Out to win this one, for being such an intuitive and craft idea for a film that worked but Del Toros imagination and attention to world building may just win this category, he’s a great story teller and that’s what may make him rise above the others here, strong competition in general though and especially from 3 Billboards.


Best Adapted Screenplay:

Call Me By Your Name (James Ivory) – winner
Logan (Scott Frank, James Mangold, and Michael Green; story by James Mangold)
Molly’s Game (Aaron Sorkin)
Mudbound (Virgil Williams and Dee Rees)
The Disaster Artist (Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber)

I’d love nothing more than for Logan to win this and I think it’d be a deserved winner but let’s face it, the academy just doesn’t fancy superhero/comic book films, though Logan is unlike any in the past 18 years or so, I think Call Me By Your Name takes this one, a well liked film with not too many noms but I think it’s the favoured one here.


Animated Feature:

The Boss Baby, Tom McGrath, Ramsey Ann Naito
The Breadwinner, Nora Twomey, Anthony Leo
Coco, Lee Unkrich, Darla K. Anderson – winner
Ferdinand, Carlos Saldanha
Loving Vincent, Dorota Kobiela, Hugh Welchman, Sean Bobbitt, Ivan Mactaggart, Hugh Welchman

How The Boss Baby is nominated for this I will never know but surely Coco has to win this, a loved film, Pixar… that’s about enough really.


Best Cinematography:

Blade Runner 2049, Roger Deakins – winner
Darkest Hour, Bruno Delbonnel
Dunkirk, Hoyte van Hoytema
Mudbound, Rachel Morrison
The Shape of Water, Dan Laustsen

Deakins, Deakins, Deakins, he’s just got to win this hasn’t he? Somehow he’s never won an Oscar for his work but he far and above deserves to win won just retroactively, let alone for the visual feast that Bladerunner 2049 was, come on Academy! That being said, Dunkirk also had some pretty spectacular cinematography.


Film Editing:

Baby Driver, Jonathan Amos, Paul Machliss – winner
Dunkirk, Lee Smith
I, Tonya, Tatiana S. Riegel
The Shape of Water, Sidney Wolinsky
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, Jon Gregory

Baby Driver all the way for this one, maybe a bit of an obvious choice but the skill and effort that went into editing that film is something else, a very snappy, stylish film in ever sense of the words and yeah, it’s a shoe-in, Dunkirk a strong competitor though.


Sound Editing:

Baby Driver, Julian Slater – winner
Blade Runner 2049, Mark Mangini, Theo Green
Dunkirk, Alex Gibson, Richard King
The Shape of Water, Nathan Robitaille, Nelson Ferreira
Star Wars: The Last Jedi, Ren Klyce, Matthew Wood

Interesting category here with some interesting choices like The Last Jedi…. anyway this may not be as predictable as people think (Baby Driver) and I think Bladerunner 2049 could surprise people with a win… but who do I want to win? Baby Driver for sure, Dunkirk may also be a favoured choice for some.


Production Design:

Beauty and the Beast, Sarah Greenwood; Katie Spencer
Blade Runner 2049, Dennis Gassner, Alessandra Querzola – winner
Darkest Hour, Sarah Greenwood, Katie Spencer
Dunkirk, Nathan Crowley, Gary Fettis
The Shape of Water,” Paul D. Austerberry, Jeffrey A. Melvin, Shane Vieau

Category with some strong nominees here for varying reasons, Beauty and the Beast may be a strong favourite for many but it’s going toe to toe with Bladerunner and Shape Of Water for me, it’s a very close to call category overall but I think Bladerunner wins this one.


Original Score:

Dunkirk, Hans Zimmer
Phantom Thread, Jonny Greenwood
The Shape of Water, Alexandre Desplat – winner
Star Wars: The Last Jedi, John Williams
Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, Carter Burwell

Very hotly contested category here with some great nominees, Hans Zimmer is a legend in the industry of course and by all means should win but I think The Shape of Water may just be a favourite here, with Dunkirk not quite having the momentum or buzz it has, maybe just due to one film being more recent than another. SOW wins.


Costume Design:

Beauty and the Beast, Jacqueline Durran – winner
Darkest Hour, Jacqueline Durran
Phantom Thread, Mark Bridges
The Shape of Water, Luis Sequeira
Victoria and Abdul, Consolata Boyle

Category with some strong choices but I think it has to go to the obvious one this time around, not Phantom Thread, Beauty and The Beast of course! It’s a film steeped in its mis-en-scene and fanciful, extravagant production design so I think it’s a shoe-in, plus everyone loves Disney (though not everyone loves the live action film trend)


Best Visual Effects:

Blade Runner 2049, John Nelson, Paul Lambert, Richard R. Hoover, Gerd Nefzer – winner
Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, Christopher Townsend, Guy Williams, Jonathan Fawkner, Dan Sudick
Kong: Skull Island, Stephen Rosenbaum, Jeff White, Scott Benza, Mike Meinardus
Star Wars: The Last Jedi, Ben Morris, Mike Mulholland, Chris Corbould, Neal Scanlan
War for the Planet of the Apes,” Joe Letteri, Dan Lemmon, Daniel Barrett, Joel Whist

Fun category, I really like all of the these films…. apart from Bladerunner, but yeah it’s an odd one to call because I think that film may just win the category outright, the Academy tends to shun comic book films and Star Wars has barely made a dent at awards in recent decades so it seems pretty obvious, I can’t see it going to Kong either but War For The Apes is the other best choice imo, if it’s not going to Bladerunner.

All in all I hope it’s a good, interesting night with some surprises.

Mute – review

Duncan Jones directs Mute, an almost crime noir drama set in a futuristic Berlin, following a mute bartender who after falling for a girl, desperately tries to find her after she disappears. The film stars Alexander Skarsgard, Paul Rudd, Justin Theroux, Seyneb Saleh and Robert Sheehan.

Duncan Jones once again confuses audiences with a film that is completely different to his last cinematic outing (Warcraft) in every single way but this is a film connected directly to a previous film of his (Moon) and we do return to a futuristic sci-fi setting for the story, set in Berlin in the maybe not too distant future, we do have robots and advanced medical equipment but no flying cars or androids a la BladerunnerAnd in doing this, the world does feel a bit strange but also a bit familiar, the setting really isn’t the main point here either and though the world may have interesting aspects to it to be explored, you’ll be disappointed if you came into the film wanting  answers to questions about lore or world building from the film.

This is a very small character and story driven film, centred on mute Amish bartender Leo (Skarsgard) who has fallen for Naadirah (saleh), a sex worker in Berlin who knows she can’t really be with him and thus you have a set up for a mismatched love story, the film has a bit of an odd structure to it, being half about Leo and his search for Naadirah in a pseudo crime noir style – he can fight but he’s no detective, though that doesn’t stop it. And half about two American ex pats in Cactus Bill (Paul Rudd) and Duck (Justin Theroux) who is almost unrecognisable in an odd blonde wig, doing odd jobs for the mob and just living their life, for about 2/3 of the film you may wonder who they are and what relevance they even have to the main story and I think this short coming is a flaw of some poor story telling. There are a few plot threads running simultaneously but not seeing them come together until significantly later in the story is a bit frustrating, that being said Rudd and Theroux are brilliant in the film, over the top in their unique ways, with Ducks in particular becoming central to a particularly dark and morbid storyline which I saw as a bit pointless to the overall story, especially in his relation to Leo who he doesn’t seem to know at all.

That being said, the setting is… interesting I suppose and the performances are good but a meandering story that takes far too long to really come to any meaningful position is what really holds the film back, with some bad storytelling to boot – we really could have used some exposition in this case! And Leo being mute which was done for dramatic effect I presume, doesn’t really add much to the story either other than making Skarsgard act that extra bit harder which he doesn’t need to – as he’s a fine actor but that’s my two cents.

I really like Duncan Jones as a filmmaker and all of his previous work but Mute feels like a bit of a misstep, a strange and strangely told story with some merit to it, at its core being a tragic love story that is just needlessly convoluted, did it even need the sci-fi setting at all? Why is Leo Amish again? Well, yeah that was weird.


. Some plot points are confusing, bad storytelling

. Scsi-fi setting seems superfluous

. Has some good performances

March film preview

March, March, March, my birth month, the start of spring and the end of the misery that is winter, springtime is seeing increasing amounts of big budget blockbusters and indie films nowadays and 2018 is no different, with a plethora of anticipated films coming out, here are some to watch out for. (US release dates by default).


Red Sparrow – released on the 2nd of March

Directed by Francis Lawrence

Starring: Jennifer Lawrence, Joel Edgerton, Mary Louise Parker and Charlotte Rampling.

Russian spy Dominika is inducted into a deadly spy prorgram and made to use her appeal and wits to secure information and take out targets, though one American target in particular may prove a complication for her and her mission.


A Wrinkle In Time – released on the 9th of March

Directed by Ava DuVernay

Starring: Oprah Winfrey, Reese Witherspoon, Guga Mbatha-Raw, Michael Pena, Storm Reid, Zach Galifinakis, Chris Pine and Levi MIller.

Fantasy film set in the US as child Meg aims to find and rescue her father, working with her younger brother, friends and some other worldly help.


The Strangers: Prey at Night – released on the 9th of March

Directed by Johannes Roberts

Starring: Christina Hendricks, Martin Henderson, Bailee Madison and Lewis Pullman.

Direct sequel to the 2008 film Strangers, a family staying in a mobile home park are visited by three masked strangers with nefarious intentions.


Tomb Raider – released on the 16th of March

Directed by Roar Uthaug

Starring: Alicia Vikander, Dominic West,  Nick Frost, Walton Goggins, Daniel Wu and Kristin Scott-Thomas.

Updated reboot of the Tomb Raider mostly based on a recent video game reboot from 2013, charting Laras upbringing and origin story as she becomes stranded on an island  where her father disappeared after a shipwreck, being tested every step of the way, she has to find a way to survive.


Pacific Rim: Uprising – released on the 23rd of March

Directed by Steven S. DeKnight

Starring: John Boyega, Scott Eastwood, Cailee Spaeny, Charlie Day, Burn Gorman, Rinko Kikuchi, Jing Tian and Adria Arjona.

Direct sequel to the 2013 Pacific Rim, 10 years later, the Jaeger program has developed and grown but the Kaiju have found a way to return to earth, evolving themselves and once again the Jaegers must fight to protect earth with a new generation of fighters, including Stacker Pentecosts son – Jake who vows to keep his fathers legacy and protect humanity.

The Shape of Water – review

The Shape Of Water is a 1960s fantasy drama, set in a US military base housing a top secret project, which takes interesting turns when a janitor forms a relationship with a creature being held at the base, the film stars Sally Hawkins, Octavia Spencer, Michael Shannon, Richard Jenkins, Doug Jones and Michael Stuhlbarg.

Visionary director Guillermo Del Toro does it again, crafting a film that is completely different from his last cinematic outing (Crimson Peak), though we’re again presented with a period drama, a bit more modern this time and set in the height of the cold war in 1960, as US forces have captured a humanoid like fish creature and plan to study it – for their own benefit of course, the premise intriguing and right from the offset, evokes a feeling of this being a modern fairytale.

This is in part helped with a somewhat unusual protagonist in the mute Elisa (Sally Hawkins) who communicates via sign language to those who can understand, Hawkins brings a spirited and dedicated performance to the role and her enthusiasm certainly brightens up an otherwise fairly darkly themed story. The performances are really what make the film overall, with Octavia Spencer being great as Zelda – Elias best friend and fellow janitor at the facility, speaking her mind and pointing out the obvious, sometimes to her detriment – which often relates to the fierce and forceful Richard (Michael Shannon) who is brilliant in this role, really emanating a sense of intimidation and menace that fairly few actors can achieve. And in terms of the actual amphibian man, the practical effects are really well done and Doug Jones really nails the vision of the physicality of a wild humanoid like fish, Jones isn’t new to this sort of character acting if you’re familiar with his work (he’s like the Andy Serkis of TV and film for costumed characters) and it shows, with his experience bringing some heft and believability to the character. And believability, you have to suspend some of it with this sort of premise of course, not just for the fish man existing but for Eliza falling in love with him, it’s a sort of mismatched, seemingly doomed to fail romance in the vein of Beauty and the beast but with a gritty, real world setting in the US in the height of the cold war which makes for an interesting dichotomy, with the added element of Russian KGB agents in the story who help to add tension to the plot.

The setting and set up quite reminds me of Del Toros arguably best film in Pans Labyrinth, with a fantastical element to the story – this time just existing in the real world as a matter of fact and if I was to bring up a criticism, certain characters lack of shock or surprise to the amphibian man may seem a bit unrealistic, almost as if it’s just another wacky experiment that in reality would completely freak people out. Also another element to point out is the soundtrack – which is fantastic, very well suited to the story and with some great albeit a tad out of the blue musical numbers that construe certain emotions that characters like Eliza may be feeling at points in the story.

Overall The Shape of Water is a good, engaging watch with strong performances, a great soundtrack and a well paced story that keeps you engaged, some elements are a bit unbelievable (even for a fantasy film) but not to the point of detracting from the film as a whole.


. Well done performances, Shannon and Hawkins are brilliant

. Engaging, simple plot with good pacing

. Some plot events may seem a bit unrealistic

Black Panther – review

Black Panther is the latest entry in the MCU, following the events of Civil War, T’Chala is set to be crowned king but has to face inevitable challenges, both to his nation and to his potential royal title, the film stars Chadwick Boseman, Michael B Jordan, Angela Bassett, Forest Whitaker, Danai Gurira, Lupita N’yongo, Winston Duke, Daniel Kaluuya, Letitia Wright, Martin Freeman and Andy Serkis.

After much hype and anticipation, Black Panther is here and is sort of a game changer for the MCU in more ways than one, being the first film in the cinematic universe with a majority black cast for one of course but the change brought on by the film goes deeper than that, though to start with that. The tone and feel of the film is just very different to previous Marvel films and you get Wakanda – and I mean a lot of Wakanda which is great and it’s crazy to think that at just over 2 hours, you barely scratch the surface of the nations lore and history. But you still get a real historical sense and understanding of it which is incredible for the average movie-goer, with just 1 or 2 brief mentions of Wakanda in the MCU previously, now knowing a fair amount about the fictional nation.

With the mis-en-scene and great production to help evoke the feeling of Wakanda being a real place – shielded by technology to the outside world, the visuals are fantastic and the vision of a technologically advanced African nation is so at odds with our modern view of Africa that it makes for great spectacle. It’s just great to see so much alternate cultural representation in a Marvel film of all things, with clear honouring and referencing to real African culture, clothing, jewellery and even body modification done respectfully, Wakanda is sort of a mish-mash of a lot of African tradition and culture rolled into one, making it quite the unique place.

The visuals on the whole are great, with well shot action scenes and a particularly notable and memorable fight sequence all done in one take – Netflix Dardevil style, from T’Chalas fight style to the Dora Milajes, the set pieces are well done and exciting with an emphasis on physicality and close combat, especially when it comes to the Panther suit itself.

One low point of the action is that early on some of it feels a bit out of focus which may be a technical error but it doesn’t remain an issue for the duration of the film, the CGI at times also looks a bit weightless. That being said, the films strengths far outweigh its few downfalls and it’s also an audible feast, with a brilliant soundtrack that evokes the culture represented in the film. Where Black Panther really shines is with its characters, a great ensemble cast with pretty much everyone giving an A+ performance, especially Chadwick Boseman and Michael B Jordan who kills it as Eric Killmonger (pun not intended), Andy Serkis is again great as Ulysses Claw and is clearly having a great time playing him. While the likes of Angela Bassett and Forest Whitaker bring some added gravitas to the film, with the dramatic moments hitting home and not being played off for laughs like previous Marvel films have been guilty of *Cough* Guardians Of The Galaxy Vol 2, there’s weight to death and sacrifice in the story and it helps to ramp up the drama.

The film brings maybe surprising depth with the themes it tackles head on with some unwavering bravery, even making you sympathize with the antagonist in Killmonger, it also raises some fascinating thoughts on the idea of tradition Vs modernity. the notion of your heroes being imperfect and nationalism, can/should loyalty to your nation stop you helping people from other nations? There’s a lot to unpack and delve into. But in my eyes the film may have a big enough impact on the MCU to rival even Civil War with events to take place in the future – though details would be spoiling things.

Ultimately Black Panther is just sort of great, a deep, emotional film with thought provoking and pertinent themes that feels very of the times, the Marvel-isms are there of course with frequent humour, inevitably conflict and action but the film felt like a well done character drama that just happens to be in the MCU. Opening up a new type of storytelling for future films and while this may not be the first big black or majority black film, it’s still a great step forward regardless in its depiction of women and for diversity in genre films – especially in the comic book film variety.


. Fantastic performances throughout the cast

. Engaging plot and story

. Brilliant characterisation, complex characters throughout the story